BioCycle World
Filtrexx's Student Design Competition at the 14th Annual Meeting of the American Ecological Engineering Society.

BioCycle September 2014, Vol. 55, No. 8, p. 8

Revisiting Urban Water Infrastructure
Green storm water infrastructure, such as this rain garden in Portland, Oregon, is becoming increasingly common to capture and infiltrate rainwater. Compost is often used in the engineered soil mixes for the rain gardens.

Transitions to practices such as green storm water infrastructure, grey water use and recycling treated wastewater are becoming more common. Part II
Sally Brown
BioCycle May 2014, Vol. 55, No. 4, p. 37

 

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Composting, Organics Recycling, Anaerobic Digestion

 

Florida County Taps Composting In Lagoon Remediation
An Algae Turf Scrubber (ATS) system cleans polluted water from the Lateral D Canal by pumping it over a sloping surface. Algae in the water attach to the ATS surface and grow, removing nutrients and other pollutants.

To help remediate Florida’s Indian River Lagoon — the most biologically diverse estuary in North America — an algal treatment system was installed, with algae harvested and composted.
Molly Farrell Tucker
BioCycle May 2014, Vol. 55, No. 4, p. 25

 

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Composting, Organics Recycling, Anaerobic Digestion

 

Green Infrastructure Incentives In Nation’s Capital
Figure 1. Example of an enhanced bioretention design with an underdrain and infiltration sump/storage layer

Innovative storm water regulation establishes private market that pays dividends to property owners for retrofits and improves Washington, DC’s waterbodies in the process.
Marsha W. Johnston
BioCycle September 2013, Vol. 54, No. 9, p. 25

 

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Composting, Organics Recycling, Anaerobic Digestion

 

Compost In The Green Infrastructure Tool Box
Runoff curve numbers (CN) have been developed to assist designers in using compost blankets as a storm water volume reduction management practice. These include vegetated blankets.

Compost blankets are very effective at “keeping rainfall where it falls,” helping to achieve maximum storm water volume reduction in tandem with bioretention cells and rain gardens. Part II
Britt Faucette
BioCycle October 2012, Vol. 53, No. 10, p. 33

 

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Composting, Organics Recycling, Anaerobic Digestion

 

Economic Case For Green Infrastructure
Green infrastructure enhancements as a result of the City of Seattle’s Green Streets program have increased real estate values there by 6 percent.

Reducing the amount of storm water and load of pollutants entering the treatment system “grid” or conveyed directly to surface waters can have an immediate impact on how much money is spent to treat these waters. Part I
Britt Faucette
BioCycle August 2012, Vol. 53, No. 8, p. 36

 

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Composting, Organics Recycling, Anaerobic Digestion

 

Ecosystem Assets Address Municipal Budget Woes
Compost sock prevents erosion

Mulch and compost products help solve maintenance problems in the short term, and provide long-term ecosystem benefits for the City of San Jose.
Paul Hagey
BioCycle May 2012, Vol. 53, No. 5, p. 31

Recycled Organics Make Splash In Green Infrastructure
Seattle storm water management

The cities of Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon have been early leaders in using storm water management tools that incorporate compost.

David McDonald, Shanti Colwell and Henry Stevens
BioCycle March 2012, Vol. 53, No. 3, p. 39